Sources

Biography

known for a single book . . . "To date Crase has published only one volume, The Revisionist (Boston, 1981), yet that has been enough . . . ." Roger Gilbert [R.G.] in Ian Hamilton, ed., The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-century Poetry in English, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1994, pp. 106-107. "Douglas Crase's sole collection of poems to date, The Revisionist, has established him as one of the major poets of his generation." Rachel Wetzsteon in Jeffrey Gray, James McCorkle, and Mary Balkun, eds., The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Poets and Poetry, vol. 1, Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut, 2006, p. 333. "He has published only one book of poems, The Revisionist, but on its strength rests a formidable underground reputation." David Lehman and John Brehm, eds., The Oxford Book of American Poetry, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 2006, p. 109. "Crase's poems have been collected to date in only one volume, The Revisionist, which won such wide acclaim that it immediately established him as a poet of significance beyond the narrow confines of a 'school.'" Terence Diggory, Encyclopedia of the New York School Poets, Facts on File, New York, 2009, p. 120. "Though Crase has not published a collection of poetry since The Revisionist, we can be glad for this one. The strength of the work will ensure that it reaches readers, through whatever means people will be reading in the future." Rob Crawford, The Revisionist by Douglas Crase & Landlocked by Mark Ford, The Best American Poetry blog, April 13, 2011. But see the dissenting opinion of Marjorie Perloff, "La Grande Permission: John Ashbery in the 21st Century," Tab: The Journal of Poetry & Poetics, vo. I, no. 2, 2013, p. 22.

"to write the report . . ." William Haber, et al., Report of the Political Reform Commission, part one, Michigan Democratic Party, Lansing, Michigan, 1969.

"he is the Doug in James Schuyler's poem . . ." David Lehman, ed., The Oxford Book of American Poetry, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 2006, p. 1009.

"interest in rhetoric . . ." Terence Diggory, ed., Encyclopedia of the New York School Poets, Facts on File Library of American Literature, New York, 2009, p. 120.

"I speak for many . . ." David Kalstone, "David Kalstone Introduces Douglas Crase and John Ashbery," Envoy, Number 46, Nancy Schoenberger and Henri Cole, eds., The Academy of American Poets, New York, 1985, pp. 1-2.

"the best single essay on Schuyler . . ." Richard Howard, "The Real World," The New York Times Book Review, April 20, 1997. The essay is Crase's memoir of Schuyler, "A Voice Like the Day," in Poetry, vol. clxiii, no. 4, January 1994, pp. 225-238.


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Works

"That Crase's invocation . . ." Phoebe Pettingell, "America in 'Metres,'" The New Leader, vol. lxiv, no. 11, June 1, 1981, pp. 14-15.

"Crase continues the search . . ." Michael Schiavo, "Douglas Crase's The Revisionist and Amerifil.txt," Tin House, no. 5, vol. 1, Fall 2003, pp. 142-146.

"Crase's dual biography of botanists extraordinaire . . ." Bruce Hainley, "Best of 2004," Artforum, December 2004, pp. 164-165.

"the best single essay . . ." Richard Howard, "The Real World," The New York Times Book Review, April 20, 1997.


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The Revisionist

"Crase is the unusual case . . ." Helen McNeil, "In the Line of the Image," Times Literary Supplement, no. 4113, January 29, 1982, p. 113.

"Crase has what it usually takes . . ." Charles Molesworth, "Three American Poets," The New York Times Book Review, August 23, 1981, pp. 12, 29.

"Crase is talented, naturalistically inclined . . ." Webster Schott, "Three Poets Light the Sky in Search for Beauty, Truth," Cleveland Plain Dealer, September 20, 1981.

"What separates Crase . . ." Rachel Wetzsteon, in Jeffrey Gray, James McCorkle, and Mary Balkun, eds., The Greenwood Encyclopedia of American Poets and Poetry, vol. 1, Greenwood Press, Westport, Connecticut, 2006, p. 334.

"Crase apostrophizes America . . ." George H. Gurley, Jr., "Poet Celebrates, Vilifies America," The Kansas City Star, Sunday, November 1, 1981.

"The Revisionist is best understood . . ." Marjorie Perloff, "La Grande Permission: John Ashbery in the 21st Century," Tab: The Journal of Poetry & Poetics, vol. I., no. 2, 2013, p.22.

"There was no better poet than . . ." Michael Schiavo, "Douglas Crase's The Revisionist and Amerifil.txt," Tin House, vol. 5, no. 1, Fall 2003, p. 143.

"For sheer ambition . . ." Jay Parini, "A New Generation of Poets," The New Republic, vol. 186, no. 15, April 14, 1982, pp. 37-39.

"In the title poem, the 'you' addressed . . . " Vernon Shetley, "Ask the Fact," The New York Review of Books, vol. xxix, no. 7, April 29, 1982, p. 43.

"Revisionism, in his supple . . ." John Ashbery, jacket copy, The Revisionist (softcover), Little, Brown and Company, Boston, 1981.

"To date Crase has published . . ." Roger Gilbert [R.G.], in Ian Hamilton, ed., The Oxford Companion to Twentieth-century Poetry in English, Oxford University Press, Oxford and New York, 1994, pp. 106-107.

other commentary on The Revisionist

Stephen Burt, "'September 1, 1939' Revisited: Or, Poetry, Politics, and the Idea of the Public," American Literary History, vol. 15, no. 3, Fall 2003, pp. 533-559, esp. 546-548, 551-553.

John Koethe, Poetry at One Remove: Essays, Poets on Poetry, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, 2000, pp. 59-61. Reprinted from Susan Schultz, ed., The Tribe of John: Ashbery and Contemporary Poetry, University of Alabama Press, Tuscaloosa, 1995, pp. 88-90.

Harold Bloom, "The Chaotic Age," The Western Canon, Harcourt Brace, New York, 1994, p. 567.

Vernon Shetley, After the Death of Poetry: Poet and Audience in Contemporary America, Duke University Press, Durham, 1993, pp. 185-188.

David Lehman, The Line Forms Here, Poets on Poetry, University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor, 1992, p. 199.

Roger Matuz, ed., Contemporary Literary Criticism, vol. 58, Gale Literary Research, Detroit, 1991, pp. 159-166. Excerpts from commentary by Phoebe Pettingell, Louis Simpson, Charles Molesworth, Helen McNeil, Jay Parini, Vernon Shetley, Robert von Hallberg, William H. Pritchard, Richard Tillinghast, and Frederick Garber.

Denise Shekerjian, Uncommon Genius: How Great Ideas Are Born, Viking, New York, 1990, pp. 45-48.

David Perkins, A History of Modern Poetry, vol. 2: Modernism and After,Belknap/​Harvard University Press, Cambridge, 1987, p. 633.

David Lehman, "The Practical Side of Poetry," Newsweek, vol. 80, September 22, 1986, p. 84.

Harold Bloom, ed., Twentieth-century American Literature, Vol. 2, C-E, The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism, Chelsea House, New York, 1986, pp. 868-876. Reprints in full the commentaries of David Kalstone, Charles Molesworth, Jay Parini, Vernon Shetley, Louis L. Martz, Hyatt H. Waggoner, Barbara Clark, Frederick Garber, and includes statement by Crase on his poem "Once the Sole Province."

B. Hal May, Contemporary Authors, vol. 106, Gale Research, Detroit, 1985, pp. 124-125. Summarizes commentaries by Christopher Cox, Phoebe Pettingell, Stephen Wigler, David Lehman, Charles Molesworth, and includes the following brief statement by Crase:

For me, right now, the liveliest poetry is an act of citizenship. Not in the 'good citizen' sense, because a poem is by nature seditious or seductive in its argument. It was said by a poet, who was known for putting us on, that poetry makes nothing happen. Of course, poetry settles nothing, but this is precisely okay; it's the great accomplishment of a poem to keep even one possibility intact. There are enough vandals in the world.
Frederick Garber, "Territorial Voices," The American Poetry Review, vol. 14, no. 1, January-February 1985, pp. 18-22.

Hyatt H. Waggoner, "Poetry in a Fearful Time," American Poets: From the Puritans to the Present, Louisiana State University Press, Baton Rouge, 1984, p. 627.

Richard Tillinghast, "Ten New Poets," The Sewanee Review, vol. xci, no. 3, Summer 1983, pp. 473-483.

William H. Pritchard, "Intelligence and Invention," Salmagundi, Number 60, Spring-Summer 1983, pp. 176-185.

Peter Balakian, "Dreaming of America," American Book Review, vol. 5, no. 2, January-February, 1983, p. 21.

Martin Krieger, "Keeping Up . . . with America," Gay Community News Book Review, January 1983, pp. 2, 6.

Louis L. Martz, The Yale Review, October 1982, pp. 73-76.

Robert von Hallberg, "American Poetry 1981," Contemporary Literature, vol. 23, no. 4, Fall 1982, pp. 556-559.

Star Black (UPI), "New Poems Address American Landscape," Celina, OH, Standard, May 21; Sacramento, CA, Union, May 21; New Smyrna Beach, FL, News & Observer, May 23; Connellsville, PA, Courier, May 24; Fort Dodge, IA, Messenger, June 2; Fairborn, OH, Herald, June 3; Cedar City, UT, Spectrum, June 4; Seattle, WA, Post-Intelligencer, June 9; others, 1982.

Dan Diamond, "A Generation, a Nation, a Self," New York Native, March 29-April 11, 1982.

Richard A. Eichwald, "The Poetry of Place," St. Louis Post-Dispatch, Sunday, February 21, 1982, p. 4B.

Jane Gentry Vance, "A Poetry of Ideas, Not Images," Louisville Courier Journal, January 10, 1982.

D. H. Myers, "Long Island Books," East Hampton Star, January 7, 1982.

Curt Suplee, "Updike, 3 Others Win Book Awards," The Washington Post, Tuesday, January 5, 1982, pp. C1, C4.

Eliot Fremont-Smith, "Critics' Choice," The Village Voice, December 23-29, 1981.

David Lehman, "Poets '81: Tomorrow's Poetry Today," Newsday, December 13, 1981, back page, continued on p. 21.

"Notable Books of the Year," The New York Times Book Review, December 6, 1981, p. 62.

Charles Guenther, "Braving the Flood of New Poetry Books," St. Louis Post-Dispatch, November 8, 1981.

Joseph Reynolds, "The Traditional in Poetry," Worcester Sunday-Telegram, July 26, 1981.

G. E. Murray, "Bridging the Gap of Self, Society," Chicago Sun-Times, July 19, 1981.

Christopher Cox, "Revising America, The Soho News, July 1, 1981, p. 16.

Peter Clothier, "In Verse," Los Angeles Times, June 14, 1981.

Louis Simpson, "The Down-to-Earth and the Acrobatic," The Washington Post Book World, June 7, 1981, pp. 4-5.

Stephen Wigler, "A Poet in Love with Rochester," Rochester Sunday Democrat and Chronicle, May 10, 1981, pp. 1C, 6C.

Barbara Clark, "Who Is the Revisionist?" Some Other Magazine, Number 2, Fall 1979, pp. 11-15.


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Amerifil.txt

"Thought-provoking and perfect . . ." Katha Pollitt, "Tidings of Discomfort and Joy," The Nation, vol. 266, no. 1, January 5, 1998, p. 9.

"It befalls me to read . . ." John Latta, hotelpoint.blogspot.com, January 7, 2005 (http:/​/​www.hotelpoint.blogspot.com/​2005_01_01_archive.html#110511128783972537).

"Crase has arranged these selections . . ." Douglas A. Storm, "customer review," amazon.com (http:/​/​www.amazon.com/​AMERIFIL-TXT-Commonplace-Book-Poets-Poetry/​dp/​0472066366/​ref=tmm_pap_title_0).

"You really should go steal . . ." storm-nemesis.blogspot.com (http:/​/​storm-nemesis.blogspot.com/​2011/​03/​hero-criminal.html).


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Both: A Portrait in Two Parts

"The fascinating account . . ." John Ashbery, dust jacket blurb, back cover.

"Ripley and Barneby first met . . ." "Briefly Noted: 'Both,'" The New Yorker, vol. 80, May 24, 2004, p. 87.

"Crase bring us the powerful, page-turning story . . ." InsightOut Book Club, May 2004.

"Their sparkling circle included . . ." L. D. Beghtol, Time Out New York, April 22-29, 2004, p. 70.

"Both is so multidimensional . . ." Rudolf Schmid, "Lives More Than Botany: Rupert Barneby (1911-2000) and Dwight Ripley (1908-1973) Come Alive," Taxon, vol. 53, no. 2, May 2004, pp. 620-621.

"an insider's insider's account." Matthew Price, "Art and Botany," Newsday, Sunday, April 11, 2004, pp. C36, C35.

"JM: 'Why should we care about these people . . ?" Judith Moore, interviewing the author, San Diego Reader, June 17, 2004, pp. 87-89.

other commentary on Both: A Portrait in Two Parts

John Akeroyd, "Both: A Portrait in Two Parts," Hortus Number 71, vol. 18, no. 3, Autumn 2004, pp. 119-123.

Ronald Christ, "Biographies of Pioneering Pairs Illuminate Aesthetic Ideas," The New Mexican, September 19, 2004.

John Akeroyd, "David and Jonathan," Plant Talk, Number 37, August 2004, p. 44.

Bobby Jay Ward, "Both: A Portrait in Two Parts," Rock Garden Quarterly, vol. 62, no. 3, Summer 2004, pp. 224-226.

Scott Eyman, "Book Review: 'Both,'" Palm Beach Post, May 9, 2004, Entertainment.

Merle Rubin, "Friendship Cultivated like a Delicate Plant," Los Angeles Times, April 12, 2004, Entertainment, p. E-13.

Benjamin Lytal, "Deeply Rooted," New York Sun, April 8, 2004.

Publishers Weekly, vol. 251, no. 6, February 9, 2004, p. 66.


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Uncollected Essays

"the best single essay . . ." Richard Howard, "The Real World," The New York Times Book Review, April 21, 1997.

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Events

"Crase has a reputation among poets . . ." David Lehman and Star Black, eds., The KGB Bar Book of Poems, Perennial/​HarperCollins, 2000, p. 55.

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